Jul/28/09: I just posted a short note on exchange rate between Serbian Dinar and US Dollar over last 500 days.

Serbian dinar

The Serbian dinar replaced the Yugoslav dinar at par in 2003, when Yugoslavia was transformed into the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro. Montenegro had already adopted the Deutsche Mark and later the euro when the mark was replaced by it.

National Bank of Serbia

The National Bank of Serbia is the central bank of the Serbia and as such its main responsibilities are the protection of price stability and maintenance of financial stability.

Core functions of the National Bank of Serbia include determining and implementation of the monetary policy, as well as that of the dinar exchange rate policy, management of the foreign currency reserves, issue of banknotes and coins, and maintenance of efficient payment and financial systems.

   Serbian Dinar Exchng/Kurs

Medieval dinar
The first mention of a "Serbian dinar" dates back to the reign of Stefan the First-Crowned of the Nemanjić dynasty in 1214. Up to the fall of Despot Stefan Lazarević in 1459, most Serbian rulers minted silver dinar coins, except during the Serbian Empire when it was replaced by the stronger perper. The coin was an important symbol of Serbian statehood in the Middle Ages.
First modern dinar, 1868-1918
Following the Ottoman conquest, different foreign currencies were used up to the mid 19th century. The Ottomans operated coin mints in Novo Brdo, Kucajna and Belgrade. The subdivision of the dinar, the para, is named after the Turkish silver coins of the same name (from the Arabic bara, silver).[citation needed]
After the Principality of Serbia was formally established (1817) there were many different foreign coins in circulation. Eventually, Prince Miloš Obrenović decided to introduce some order by establishing exchange rates based on the grosh (Serbian грош, French and English piastre, Turkish kuruş) as money of account. In 1819 Miloš published a table rating 43 different foreign coins: 10 gold, 28 silver, and 5 copper.[1] After the last Ottoman garrisons were withdrawn in 1867, steps were taken to establish an independent national monetary system.
Faced with multiple currencies in circulation, Prince Mihailo Obrenović ordered that a Serbian national currency be minted. The first bronze coins were introduced in 1868, followed by silver in 1875 and gold in 1879. The first banknotes were issued in 1876. Between 1873 and 1894, the dinar was pegged at par to the French franc. The Kingdom of Serbia also joined the Latin Monetary Union.
In 1918, the Serbian dinar was replaced at par by the Yugoslav dinar, with the Yugoslav krone also circulating until 1920.
On Feb 25 09: 1 Serbian Dinar=0.0173 US dollars
Second modern dinar, 1941-1944
In 1941, the Yugoslav dinar was replaced by the Serbian National Bank, at par, by a second Serbian dinar for use in the German occupied state. The dinar was pegged to the German Reichsmark at a rate of 250 dinara = 1 Reichsmark. This dinar circulated until 1944, when the Yugoslav dinar was reintroduced by the Communist Partisans, replacing the Serbian dinar at a rate of 1 Yugoslav dinar = 20 Serbian dinara.
Third modern dinar, 2003-
The Serbian dinar replaced the Yugoslav dinar at par in 2003, when Yugoslavia was transformed into the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro. Montenegro had already adopted the Deutsche Mark and later the euro when the mark was replaced by it.
National Bank of Serbia
The National Bank of Serbia is the central bank of the Serbia and as such its main responsibilities are the protection of price stability and maintenance of financial stability.
Core functions of the National Bank of Serbia include determining and implementation of the monetary policy, as well as that of the dinar exchange rate policy, management of the foreign currency reserves, issue of banknotes and coins, and maintenance of efficient payment and financial systems.